Author Archives: Susan Moynihan

Monona Community Pool protective netting.

Monona Community Pool Protective Net

Keeper Goals recently installed protective barrier netting for the Monona Community Pool in Winnequah Park. The Monona Community Pool is a popular summer spot for the residents of Monona Grove, Wisconsin.

The barrier net system is designed to protect the people in the pool from ??? The post system is designed to meet the wind load for the area. The netting is

The custom designed barrier net system at Monona Community Pool is 100′ wide and 40′ high and covers the area on one side of the pool. The bottom of the net is raised to 16″ above ground to allow for grass cutting. The poles are made of heavy-duty 8″ schedule 40 steel pipe and are powder-coated black. Learn more about Keeper Goals back-up netting systems for athletic facilities at http://www.keepergoals.com/products/nets_and_net_attachment/back_up_nets-new.html.

“The Monona Community Pool is a great facility. We are pleased we were able to supply protective netting for their pool,” said John Moynihan, president and CEO of Keeper Goals.

Net rolled on wheeled soccer goal at Alverno College in Wisconsin.

Got soccer nets that are too big? Here’s a cheap and simple solution.

Soccer goals look the best when the nets hang neatly on the goal. And soccer goals with wheels are easiest to move when the nets don’t hang down onto the wheels.

However, sometimes nets are made slightly oversized and other nets will stretch over time, (especially if you’ve purchased good quality nets that last for several years).

Don’t despair there is an easy, inexpensive, (actually free), way to adjust your nets to fit your goals. Simply roll them and clip them along the base of the goal.

How to attach a net to a wheeled soccer goal:

1.) Start with the bottom cord of the net in one corner of the goal and roll it.

2.) Pull the bottom cord of the net through the rolled portion.

3.) Clip the bottom cord of the net with the net clip attached to the cable.

  • If your goals don’t have a cable net attachment system with clips you will need to use an alternate method of securing the net.
  • Zip ties and velcro are two alternatives you may want to consider.

4.) Continue around the bottom of the goal making certain to roll the net adequately to clear the wheels.

5.) That is all!

Watch video icon  Watch a :53 second how-to video >

Duckbill Anchors – a great option for anchoring movable soccer goals.

 

If soil conditions allow we feel the Duckbill Anchor is the most effective method of anchoring a movable soccer goal.

If you want the most secure and cost-effective method of anchoring movable soccer goals you’ll want to consider using Duckbill anchors.

There are many ways to anchor movable soccer goals; driven stakes, anchor weights, j-hooks, sandbags, concrete footings, etc. …   All these methods of anchoring help soccer goals become more secure if used properly, especially when compared to a soccer goal with no anchors at all. However, each has drawbacks.

“If normal soil conditions exist, we feel the Duckbill anchor is the most effective way of anchoring a movable soccer goal” said Chris Bielefeld, Structural Engineer at Keeper Goals.

A Duckbill anchor is a small metal anchor attached to the end of a galvanized wire rope. It is driven into the ground using a hammer and a steel driver rod (no holes, no digging and no concrete is required). By applying an upward pull on the wire rope, the Duckbill anchor rotates into a perpendicular position in the soil. The result is an extremely strong anchor. Typically a chain and lock are attached to the free end of the wire rope to attach to and secure the goal. Plastic ground sleeves may be purchased separately to allow for the chain and lock to be stored and protected below the ground surface. When a goal needs to be moved, the chain and lock can be easily removed and stored, whereas, driven stakes or j-hooks could be difficult to remove and will need to be stored separately.

Duckbill anchors can sometimes be difficult to drive into the ground, no different than any other driven anchor or stake. Duckbill anchors are safer than traditional stakes or anchors because they leave no rigid rods or stakes above ground that could cause injury.

Stake and j-hook style anchors could pull out very easily when installed in very wet or very dry soil. Per the manufacturer, a Duckbill anchor has a specified rated capacity, whereas, driven stakes and j-hooks do not. A rated capacity provides a stated value of uplift resistance when installed in normal soil conditions. The uplift resistance of driven stake and j-hook style anchors cannot be quantified without testing them in the soil at the actual goal location.

Find Duckbill anchors for movable soccer goals at keepergoals.com.

Soccer Goal Size and Material Requirements

While adult soccer goals are a standard 8′ x 24′ youth soccer goal sizes vary.  Different organizations recommend different goal sizes for each age group.  Our Suggested Soccer Goal Size Chart can give you some assistance.  However, to make sure you have accurate information on recommended goal sizes for your area we suggest you check with your local soccer league  for their specific requirements.

Soccer Goal Size Requirements By Organization:

FIFA

Fifa.com defines a soccer goal in this manner; “A goal consists of two upright posts equidistant from the corner flag posts and joined at the top by a horizontal crossbar. The goalposts and crossbar must be made of wood, metal or other approved material. They must be square, rectangular, round or elliptical in shape and must not be dangerous to players.

‘The distance between the posts is 7.32 m (8 yds) and the distance from the lower edge of the crossbar to the ground is 2.44 m (8 ft).

Both goalposts and the crossbar have the same width and depth, which do not exceed 12 cm (5 ins). The goal lines must be of the same width as the goalposts and the crossbar. Nets may be attached to the goals and the ground behind the goal, provided that they are properly supported and do not interfere with the goalkeeper.

The goalposts and crossbars must be white.”

The position of the goalposts in relation to the goal line must be according to the graphics (shown on fifa.com)

NCAA, (National Collegiate Athletic Association)

The NCAA Soccer 2012 and 2013 Rules and Interpretations Book Rule 1.9, (Goals) states:

“The goals shall be anchored, secured or counterweighted.  The goal posts, which shall be superimposed on goal lines of the same width and depth, shall consist of two posts, equidistant from the corner flags and 8 yards (7.32 m) apart (inside measurement), joined by a horizontal crossbar of similar material, the lower edge of which shall be 8 feet (2.44 m) from the ground.

The width or diameter of the goal posts and crossbar shall not be less than 4 inches (10.16 cm) nor more than 5 inches (12.7 cm).  The posts and crossbar may be square, rectangular, round or elliptical in shape, and shall be painted white.

In addition, no markings other than a single manufacturer’s identification/logo of appropriate size may appear on the goal posts or the crossbar. “

NFHS (National Federation of High School)

Rule 1-4-1 – Goals: The goals shall be placed on the goal line. They shall consist of two upright posts between 4 inches and 5 inches in projected diameter placed an equal distance from the corner flags and 8 yards apart (inside measurement). The rear of each goal post shall be on the outer edge of the goal line. The tops of the posts shall be joined by a 4-inch, but not more than 5-inch horizontal crossbar, the lower edge of which shall be 8 feet from the ground. Soccer goals shall be white. No markings other than a single manufacturer’s identification/logo may
appear on the goal posts or crossbar.
Metal pipes of 3 to 4 inches in diameter may be used. If portable goals are used, they shall be adequately anchored, secured or counter-weighted to the ground. If used on a football field, portable goals should be anchored at least 2 yards in front of the base of the existing football goalposts.
The vertical portion of the soccer goal post may be padded with commercially manufactured material for soccer goals. This material shall be white, have a maximum thickness of one inch, be a minimum of 72 inches high and shall be properly secured. No markings other than a single manufacturer’s identification/logo may appear on the goal post padding.

This is from NFHS May 5th, 2010 Rules interpretation – National Federation High School rules.

US Youth Soccer

The US Youth Soccer website lists the following sizes for youth soccer goals:

U6  6′ x 18′ or smaller

U8 6′ x 18′ or smaller

U10  6′ x 18′ or smaller

U12  6′ x 18′

U14 and older  8′ x 24′

AYSO

AYSO’s website lists the following sizes for youth soccer goals;

Jamboree Games – Maximum of 4′ high and 6′ wide or 2 tall cones set 6 feet apart

U6 – Maximum 4′ high and 6′ wide OR four tall cones, two each set six feet apart

U8Maximum 6′ high and 18′ wide

U10 – Maximum 7′ high and 21′ wide

U12 8′ high x 24′ wide

Check out some of our favorite soccer goals in the following sizes;

2′ x 4′ Soccer Goals
4′ x 6′ Soccer Goals
6′ x 12′ Soccer Goals
6′ x 18′ Soccer Goals
7′ x 21′ Soccer Goals
8′ x 24′ Soccer Goals
8′ x 24′ Box-style Soccer Goals

Shopping For Back-up Netting For Your Baseball, Lacrosse, Softball or Soccer Facility? Here are 3 Tips To Help You Shop Better…

Back-up netting at soccer stadium.Back-up netting behind soccer goal.Back-up netting for your soccer, lacrosse, baseball, or softball facility can help protect buildings, cars, fans and passers-by. The protection offered by back-up netting makes it a worthwhile investment. Just how big an investment you ask?  Well, that depends, there are so many options.

Many variables affect what type of back-up netting system you should choose;  budget, climate,  how the net will be used,  who will be maintaining the netting system, to name a few.  To insure you’ll get back-up netting that will meet your needs and fit your budget do some homework before you start shopping.

1.) Determine what your needs are;

• Will you need just the nets or will you need a complete back-up netting system with something to anchor the netting such as posts?

• Will the nets stay up all the time?  if not how often will they need to be taken down?  Who will be taking them down, (trained maintenance staff or others?)

• Will the posts be permanent or will they need to be moved?  If they will need to be moved how often will they need to be moved and by whom?

• What will be the smallest object you are trying to stop? (This will help you determine what mesh size will work best for you.)

• How big an area do you want to protect with the netting?

2.)  Do some research and know some basic facts about back-up netting before you start getting prices.  We’ll get you started with our  recommendations for;

A. Height Of the Posts

• For soccer 20’ is the minimum, 25’ is better, 30’ will stop the majority of balls behind the goal

• For baseball and softball 30’ to 40’ is common for behind home plate

• For lacrosse 10′ is minimum, 15′ is better and 20′ is great

B.  Length Of the Net*

• Typically for soccer nets are installed behind the goals. 60’ wide is the minimum, 85’ is recommended and 132’ covers the width of the penalty box.

• Baseball and softball back-up netting is custom and is based on the needs of the facility.

• The width of lacrosse fields vary and so does the length of back-up nets.  The most common back-up nets for lacrosse are somewhere between 110′ – 170′.

*Keep in mind you will never stop all the balls in any sport. Obviously the bigger the net, the greater the chance of stopping more balls.

C. Size Of the Smallest Object You Want To Stop To Determine the Optimal Mesh Size

• Soccer, volleyball, football, basketball – 4” mesh

• Baseball or softball -1 ¾” or 1 7/8” mesh

• Lacrosse and hockey – 1 ½” or 1 3/16” mesh

• Golf – 7/8” mesh

3. Plan ahead so you can set a realistic budget.

In our experience most people underestimate the cost of a good back-up netting system.  Quality, durable back-up net systems aren’t cheap, but a well designed system will last for many years.  As with most big projects, it’s best to plan well in advance.

When planning for your system it will be best for your budget to opt for a stationary back-up netting system.  If your facility can utilize a stationary system the costs will be less than a sleeved or ground anchor system and considerably less than a portable system.  Portable systems are by far the most expensive.

To learn more Download our Back-up Net Buyers Guide >

 

 

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Two wheeled soccer goals pushed together and locked together for safety at Murray Park in Murray

You’ve probably already heard  the bad news:  Movable soccer goals can be dangerous – they can injure and even kill people if improperly used.  The good news is there are many things you can do to make sure your movable soccer goals are safe.  See the checklist below for specifics soccer goal safety suggestions

The American Society For Testing and Materials, (ASTM), developed a standard for tip-resistant soccer goals.  It is titled ASTM F2673 – 08 Standard Safety Specification for Special Tip-Resistant Movable Soccer Goals.  You can read a summary of this standard or purchase it in its entirety on the ASTM website.

As ASTM F2673  indicates the first step towards movable soccer goal safety is to start with a safer goal.  This does not mean that goals labeled tip-resistant are tip-proof.  Any movable goal can tip in the right conditions unless it is properly anchored.  See some of Keeper Goals soccer goals meeting the criteria of ASTM F2673

In accordance with ASTM F2673 we urge the purchaser of ANY movable soccer goal to make certain all movable soccer goals are anchored and secured at all times. Additional weights, stakes and anchors are always available that can help you help make your goals even safer for the users. We encourage the use of these items for your soccer goals at all times.

Duckbill underground anchor on a wheeled soccer goal.

Underground duckbill anchor – an excellent way to secure a movable soccer goal.

A few points to be aware of regarding ASTM F2673:

  • ASTM F2673 sets standards for soccer goals that are tip-resistant, not tip-proof.  (All movable goals should always be anchored or secured regardless of whether or not they meet the ASTM Standards For Tip Resistant Soccer Goals.)
  • Tests to pass ASTM 2673 simulate 2 110 lb. children hanging and swinging from the crossbar.
  • ASTM 2673 only applies to soccer goals 6.5 x 18’ and larger.) However, any size movable soccer goal can tip under the right conditions, (high winds, uneven ground, enough force/weight applied to the goal.)
  • Smaller goals that are exempt from ASTM 2673 are often heavy enough to cause serious injury or death if over-turned.

Education and awareness are also critically important to enhanced soccer goal safety. You can help by educating the users of movable soccer goals, (players, parents, maintenance staff, coaches, ect.) You can find more information by visiting our website’s safety page. Soccer goal safety information is also available upon request. Please feel free contact us with any questions at info@keepergoals.com or 800-594-5126;

Soccer Goal Safety Checklist:

  • Movable goals must be properly anchored or secured at all times.
  • Wheeled goals must be properly anchored or secured at all times and additionally the wheels must be locked and the vertical slide must be in a down position at all times, (other than when the goals are actually being moved.)
  • Do not set-up, use or store any goal on a slope or hill.
  • Check that all fastenings are tightened securely.
  • Consistently check to ensure that no one has tampered with fasteners.
  • Regularly inspect the structural integrity of the goal.
  • Check for broken welds or parts. Do not use a goal with broken parts.
  • NEVER climb on, or hang from, the framework of a goal. This message should be repeatedly told to kids, coaches and parents.
  • Regularly check to insure warning labels are visible on all movable soccer goals.
  • Goals should only be moved by trained adults. Have adequate manpower when moving goals. Use caution when moving goals.
  • Goals should be re-anchored after each move.
  • Remove nets when goals are not in use.
  • Never leave children unsupervised with soccer nets.
  • Make sure goals are secured by locking them together, or anchoring them to the ground, before leaving the field.
  • Make sure the goals you buy meet the standards set by the Consumer Product and Safety Commission and the American Society For Testing and Materials.